Overview Overview Search Search Up Up
Category: Session Block 8
Order Files by:
Default | Name | Author | Date | Hits
 
Select all files:
Files:
pdf.png SB 743 Practicum HOT

(0 votes)

SB 743 requires changes to the CEQA Guidelines that will affect the CEQA process, and ultimately may affect land use and transportation planning, for lead agencies throughout the state. SB 743 mandates a change in the methodology for determining transportation impacts from use of the traditional congestion metric of level of service (LOS) to the use of the vehicle miles traveled (VMT) metric, but provides for flexibility in lead agency identification of specific significance thresholds, tools to evaluate VMT impacts, mitigation to be applied to reduce impacts, and consideration of alternatives. This session will review innovative tools and techniques local and regional agencies are using to implement this new CEQA guidance, in the interim period while final guidance is being developed.  This will include a review of: techniques for selecting appropriate thresholds of significance that address VMT; modeling tools to evaluate VMT impacts; mitigation techniques to reduce VMT impacts; and policy techniques to plan for and facilitate local infill and mixed-use development projects. Learn how you can take advantage of these emerging tools and techniques to comply with anticipated CEQA guidance and create more sustainable communities.



Created
Size
Downloads
2015-05-05
812.78 KB
138
pdf.png It’s Not Just Water Under the Bridge: Construction Permitting and Underwater Sound Monitoring and Mitigation for Aquatic Animals

(0 votes)

Most people are at one time or another impacted by construction noise near their home or work, and often the effect of this noise can have negative impacts on daily life. But many people are not as familiar with how sound waves and vibrations from construction projects in and near bodies of water can negatively affect the home and quality of life for aquatic animals living in close proximity to those projects. As the impacts of construction activities on underwater animals are better understood, environmental permits require mitigation and monitoring for these hydroacoustic effects. For instance, the potential effects of peak underwater sound pressures on fish mortality and spawning behavior have resulted in limits being placed on construction activities, including limiting the seasons of the year during which pile driving can be conducted, and implementation of sound mitigation measures. Similar mitigations have been defined for mammals and other aquatic species. In this presentation, we will offer an overview of the current policies to protect aquatic animals from underwater sound generated by construction methods and present information on planning for such requirements. We will discuss environmental requirements established by the California Department of Fish and Wildlife through their Incidental Take Permit process, and requirements for consultation with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, National Marine Fisheries Service.



Created
Size
Downloads
2015-06-12
2.9 MB
73